Is Your ADC Ready for Multi-Cloud Deployments?

Moving to “the cloud,” as it’s casually known, is a misnomer. There isn’t a single, homogeneous cloud destination, but rather, a spectrum of different types of clouds ranging from private to public, and multiple varieties in between. In addition, there are multiple public cloud providers to choose from. As enterprises increasingly adopt diverse cloud strategies and run business-critical applications in multiple clouds, this has major implications for ensuring application delivery. And not all Application Delivery Controllers (ADCs) are up to the job for multi-cloud deployments.

Best Practices for Load Balancing Docker Containers

Containers are rapidly becoming the go-to software tool for application developers, and Docker is one of the most-loved container platforms according to the latest Stack Overflow developer survey. Docker simplifies software development so that developers can build applications that are lightweight, easily scalable and can run on any infrastructure. But when it comes to management and orchestration, the platform needs to be augmented with modern load balancing to ensure that business-critical applications are always up, fast and secure.

How to Intelligently Auto-Scale in the Hyperscale Era

The term hyperscale has become almost synonymous with huge cloud companies like Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Netflix. But the benefits of hyperscale computing are not limited to the realms of the world’s cloud computing giants. You don’t have to be a “hyperscaler” in size to achieve dynamic scalability and gain the resulting advantages of agility and cost efficiency. This blog explains how auto-scaling Application Delivery Controllers (ADCs) protect businesses of all sizes against any network eventuality so that critical applications are always up, fast and secure. 

How secure are your web servers?

Picture this: you have just completed a brand new installation of a server (Windows Server, Ubuntu, etc.) where you are going to deploy your organization's web portal. You need to ensure this service stays online and protected from bad actors.

5 Key Metrics For Improving Application Performance

The rise of DevOps engineers has changed how IT teams monitor the health of their systems and networks. Rather than having a siloed organization with specialized staff managing specific pieces of equipment, a DevOps team comprises tech generalists who take a more holistic view of the system and prioritize application performance. They need a different set of metrics, along with notifications and alerts, to analyze how business-critical applications are performing. This blog highlights five key metrics for optimizing application performance. 

Optimizing Application Delivery for Red Hat

In this blog we look at Red Hat, one of the market’s innovative enterprise Linux OS providers, and how Snapt’s standalone ADC solution, Snapt Aria, meets the needs of Red Hat deployments.   

How to Choose the Right ADC for Kubernetes

If you’re running your business applications in containers and managing those with Kubernetes, you’re probably aware of the limitations of traditional Application Delivery Controllers (ADCs) in this environment. Traditional ADCs simply do not have the scalability and agility needed for cloud native deployments. Whether you’re already up and running in containers or just getting started, this blog will tell you all you need to know for choosing the right ADC for Kubernetes.

Nova establishes Snapt as leading provider of application delivery fabric

Graduating from a successful alpha to a commercial public beta, Snapt Nova is poised to revolutionize application delivery control with unrivalled support for cloud environments, container platforms, self-learning and true hyperscale.

Don’t Let Your Business Pay the Price of Downtime

If you're considering whether you can afford running more than one server for your business, you're likely to discover that you can't afford not to. Even with the additional operational expenses, you’ll be better off having redundant servers because redundancy minimizes downtime for your critical applications and reduces the costs incurred by outages, which can be huge. The price of downtime is always too high for any business.

Like it or not, IT downtime is a fact of life. Systems fail. Outages happen. The failure rate of cloud servers is roughly 2% annually, for example. The larger the installation, the more frequently outages will occur. The best way to deal with these inevitable worst-case scenarios is to be prepared and minimize the downtime as much as possible.

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